Smithfield Developer Exploring Railroad Quiet Zone

Mike McLamb has asked the Smithfield Town Council to petition CSX to study the Peedin Street crossing off North Brightleaf Boulevard as a potential railroad quiet zone crossing. McLamb has agreed to pay the $6,000 application fee. JoCoReport.com Photo

At the request of a local landowner and developer, the Town of Smithfield is exploring the possibility of having a Quiet Zone for trains at the Peedin Street railroad crossing.

Under federal law, trains are required to sound their horns at all public crossings 24 hours a day to alert motorists and pedestrians.  If approved, a Quiet Zone would allow trains to pass through an intersection without sounding their horn.

Developer Mike McLamb has asked the Town of Smithfield to petition CSX to study the Peedin Street crossing to see if it could be turned into a Quiet Zone.  A minimum of a half-mile distance is required along the tracks, and four quadrant gates and flashing lights at the crossing for drivers and pedestrians.

McLamb said it would be a tremendous asset for the area including nearby motels and hotels.

Only government agencies can request a Quiet Zone. McLamb said he would pay the required $6,000 application fee to CSX if the Town of Smithfield would petition CSX to study the crossing.

Mayor Pro Tem Emery Ashley questioned McLamb about increased safety risks and accidents.  McLamb said the federal Department of Transportation and CSX had multiple guidelines that had to be followed.

The council agreed to file the application with CSX to study the Peedin Street crossing for a possible upgrade to a Quiet Zone as long as McLamb pays the $6,000 application fee.

Only two quiet zone crossings exist in North Carolina.

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  • Jimmy Phillips

    My first question is why? Personally, I do not see any benefit to the town but I do see that there could be numerous accidents and fatalities. Accidents at R/R crossings happen even when there are horns blown and safety lights flashing. Case in point happened in Princeton just a few years ago(the infant died a day or two later.http://www.wral.com/news/local/video/3455449/……When it comes to rail crossings we need more safety features implemented in Johnston County, not less!

  • Jimmy Phillips

    My first question is why? Personally, I do not see any benefit to the town but I do see that there could be numerous accidents and fatalities. Accidents at R/R crossings happen even when there are horns blown and safety lights flashing. Case in point happened in Princeton just a few years ago(the infant died a day or two later.http://www.wral.com/news/local/video/3455449/……When it comes to railroad crossings we need more safety features implemented in Johnston County, not less!

  • peppercorns

    Way to go Johnston County! Cave to the needs of a money hungry developer rather then keep the good citizens safe and sound. I used to live near a crossing ….and after a week or so you never hear it again.

  • Frankie TF

    Because Trains are traveling 65+ mph on curvy tracks, often we, Fuel Tanker Trucks, have windows rolled down looking and listening during crossing. An explosion can take out one city block or more, of sleeping residents. Are human lives, really worth a quiet zone?

  • JordanandJess Creech

    I see why you feel concerned about safety, but if you would relax and look up a quiet zone crossing then you will see that they have other extra safety features in place. This man is only trying to help improve the town and help visitors(who spend money in our town) have a quiet nights sleep. You shouldn’t judge and call others names without knowing all of the facts.
    https://oli.org/rail-safety/quiet-zoneso

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  • Jimmy Phillips

    My first question is why? Personally, I do not see any benefit to the town but I do see that there could be numerous accidents and fatalities. Accidents at R/R crossings happen even when there are horns blown and safety lights flashing. Case in point happened in Princeton just a few years ago(the infant died a day or two later.http://www.wral.com/news/local/video/3455449/……When it comes to rail crossings we need more safety features implemented in Johnston County, not less!

  • Jimmy Phillips

    My first question is why? Personally, I do not see any benefit to the town but I do see that there could be numerous accidents and fatalities. Accidents at R/R crossings happen even when there are horns blown and safety lights flashing. Case in point happened in Princeton just a few years ago(the infant died a day or two later.http://www.wral.com/news/local/video/3455449/……When it comes to railroad crossings we need more safety features implemented in Johnston County, not less!

  • peppercorns

    Way to go Johnston County! Cave to the needs of a money hungry developer rather then keep the good citizens safe and sound. I used to live near a crossing ….and after a week or so you never hear it again.

  • Frankie TF

    Because Trains are traveling 65+ mph on curvy tracks, often we, Fuel Tanker Trucks, have windows rolled down looking and listening during crossing. An explosion can take out one city block or more, of sleeping residents. Are human lives, really worth a quiet zone?

  • JordanandJess Creech

    I see why you feel concerned about safety, but if you would relax and look up a quiet zone crossing then you will see that they have other extra safety features in place. This man is only trying to help improve the town and help visitors(who spend money in our town) have a quiet nights sleep. You shouldn’t judge and call others names without knowing all of the facts.
    https://oli.org/rail-safety/quiet-zoneso